Why Do You Want to Write a Book?

Experts tell us that 81% of Americans want to write a book.  So chances are pretty high that if you’re reading this, you are one of them.  There are many reasons people want to write a book.  Your motivations are probably a combination of these factors: Communication: Having a book is a wonderful way to communicate your message to a broader audience.  If you are a speaker or teacher you can exponentially increase your audience with a book.  If you have any area of expertise, a book can help you leverage that expertise.  Writing a book will help you find … Read More

Is 48 Days just hype?

Dear Cynic – You are right to question spending any money or time in a self-help program. But don’t slam the door completely. I started selling 48 Days to the Work You Love in a 3-ring binder with two CDs in 1996. And yes, I generated over $2 Million with that version, packaging them in our upstairs bonus room.

Write a book – you’ve got to be kidding

I love writing in all its forms: blogs, articles, books, etc.  However, the statistics for choosing this as a career are dismal.  One in four Americans does not read one book per year.  Over 200,000 new books were published last year.  Average book sales for a Christian book put out by a major publisher are about 4,000 copies.  AuthorSolutions reports that sales of their self-published titles average about 150 copies each.  The average sales overall for a book published in America is about 500.  Yes, sales of eBooks is growing.  But if you think that technology is eliminating “real” books … Read More

No Money – Just Think

The most common complaint I hear today is “Dan, I’d do something on my own but I don’t have any money”  Fortunately, many of the best ideas do not require buildings, leases, employees, or inventory.  And many can be started with very little, if any, capital. Here are some recent hits:   A hunter got an option on 400 isolated acres, then sold 40 hunting licenses for $5000 each.  He then completed the purchase free and clear and pocketed approximately $50,000. An artifacts dealer arranged an exhibit for some rare Dead Sea Scroll pieces.  He had 30,000 people come through a … Read More

We all have obstacles

In the new Thomas Nelson book, Obstacles Welcome, author and CEO of AT&T Mobility Ralph de la Vega tells of his rise from a Cuban orphan to his position of business success.  The business principles of have clear goals, work hard, and treat your people well are valid but not new. The potential uniqueness of the book would have been in telling how that transition from leaving his family in Cuba at 10 years old to become a business leader occurred.  Unfortunately, for whatever reason, those details of his personal story are missing. I’ve always been drawn to the Horatio Alger … Read More

“Find your strongest life” by Marcus Buckingham

In his newest book, “Find Your Strongest Life: What the Happiest and Most Successful Women Do Differently,” Marcus Buckingham continues his theme of helping people find their unique strengths.  While he does allow for a broad definition of “success” it still comes across clearly that a successful woman will be expected to be a great wife, mom and career climber.  Chapter Nine —  Strive for Imbalance — is a great read for men as well as women – as it applies to work.  The author says to ignore balance and chose instead to find your “strong-moments” and find ways to … Read More

Read a good vook lately?

No, that’s not a misspelling.  It’s just a description of a new combination of book and video.  How would you like to read one of your favorite books but find it interspersed with frequent video clips to help bring the story to life?  Obviously, it’s a natural integration and now technology has made it quite easy to do.  My son Jared and I are writing a book on the differing generational approaches to work.  Do you think a traditional 240-page tradebook is the best format to reach the 25-35 yr-old audience?  What about a vook that provides the concepts of new … Read More

Can’t even slow me down

On December 21st I received a certified letter from the publishing company of one of my previous books.  They informed me that a miscalculation had been made in my last royalty check and I needed to send them a correction check for $42,787.60 immediately.   On responding via email and phone I received messages that no one would be in the office until Jan 2nd.  No phone call, no “gee Dan we think we made a mistake,” just a certified letter demanding payment.  Not exactly the way I would recommend doing business, but then again the publishing world is full of … Read More